We Share the Same Sky

 

Chapter IV: The End of the World
In this short episode, Rachael takes us to Sobibor—the site of the extermination camp where Hana’s family was deported to in 1942. (includes disturbing content)
Learning Objectives:
  • Understand how the Nazis conditioned people to accept inhumanity.
  • Understand what life was like in concentration camps and how they were designed to demean as well as to exterminate.
  • Consider the factors on a society-level that lead to upstander behavior and a culture of inclusion.
  • Sobibor was a Nazi death camp located in occupied-Poland. In the 17 months between May 1942 and October 1943, about 250,000 Jews from Poland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union were killed there. Three of those victims were Hana’s younger brother, Petr, and her mother and father, Emilie and Josef. <br/><br/>Photo by Rachael Cerrotti / 2015 Sobibor was a Nazi death camp located in occupied-Poland. In the 17 months between May 1942 and October 1943, about 250,000 Jews from Poland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union were killed there. Three of those victims were Hana’s younger brother, Petr, and her mother and father, Emilie and Josef.

    Photo by Rachael Cerrotti / 2015
  • Sobibor was a Nazi death camp located in occupied-Poland. In the 17 months between May 1942 and October 1943, about 250,000 Jews from Poland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union were killed there. Three of those victims were Hana’s younger brother, Petr, and her mother and father, Emilie and Josef. This is a photo of one of many stones that line a pathway leading towards the center of the camp. It is inscribed with, “For the Unknown.” <br/><br/>Photo by Rachael Cerrotti / 2015 Sobibor was a Nazi death camp located in occupied-Poland. In the 17 months between May 1942 and October 1943, about 250,000 Jews from Poland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union were killed there. Three of those victims were Hana’s younger brother, Petr, and her mother and father, Emilie and Josef. This is a photo of one of many stones that line a pathway leading towards the center of the camp. It is inscribed with, “For the Unknown.”

    Photo by Rachael Cerrotti / 2015